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32A Armature Plate.

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  • 32A Armature Plate.

    Not good with electrickery, hence the post.

    Have what I believe is a Armature Plate from a 34A .
    Can I use this in my 32A engine?
    Is this 6v or 12v?
    The only difference I can see in the 32A Armature Plate and the 34A one is that the Ignition Coil fixes from the front on the 34A and on the rear on the 32A one.

    Thanks, John.

    Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    The set up should be the same for 32A and 34A a six volt system. The difference in the engine is barrel piston and head. 32A is a road / trials engine. The 34A a tuned (scramble) version

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    • #3
      Originally posted by John Wakefield View Post
      The set up should be the same for 32A and 34A a six volt system. The difference in the engine is barrel piston and head. 32A is a road / trials engine. The 34A a tuned (scramble) version
      Thank you!

      John.

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      • #4
        As stated before, not good with electrickery hence another question.....Can't get a spark and I'm guessing the Ignition coil may be shot. The old coil has a small pad for the spring loaded H.T. lead but the new coil I purchased does not. Could I just solder the H.T. lead on and do away with the sprung H.T. pick up? The old coil is, according to book is M.2722E and the new one I bought is also M2722E, identical apart from the small pad for the H.T. lead. Had a search online but can't find any coil the same as my old one.

        Cheers, John.

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        • #5
          Yes solder HT lead to coil, in fact that will be a better connection than the spring type connection

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          • #6
            How does the magnetism in the flywheel feel? They deteriorate over time but can be refreshed. put a spanner across it and you should be able to easily lift the whole off the ground

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            • #7
              There are a lot of 'old wives tales' about magnetism, in practice the magnetism is unlikely to had deteriorated that much to effect the spark. The 'picking it up with a spanner test' is not a conclusive. I have found sparks to be ok on flywheels that fail that test. Usually no spark is due to a poor connection or earthing, dirty/burnt contact breakers etc.

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              • #8
                It's not a conclusive test, but without other sophisticated test equipment it's the best we have. I've found that yes sometimes this does not cause no spark, but other times there us some current at the plug but not a lot

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                • #9
                  Thanks for replies, appreciated!
                  I think it was the magnets in the flywheel.
                  Three out of six of the magnets in the flywheel were poor. Changed flywheel with six decent magnets and now have big blue spark.
                  All the original coils appear to be working as is the, I think, Villiers original condenser.

                  Getting there

                  Cheers, John.

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                  • #10
                    Recommend that you change the condenser, it's only cheap but failure generally is a bugger

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